Historic Fort Snelling

National Historic Landmark

Mailing Address:
200 Tower Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55111
Directions

Hours

Closed for the season except for special events.
 
Memorial Day Weekend-Labor Day:
Tue-Sat 10 am-5 pm
Sun Noon-5 pm
 
Open Memorial Day, July 4, and Labor Day, 10 am-5 pm
 
Sept-Oct:
Sat Only 10 am-5 pm

 

Admission

Get Tickets
  • $12 adults
  • $10 seniors and college students w/ID
  • $10 veterans and active military
  • $6 children ages 5-17
  • Free for children age 4 and under and MNHS members
  • Museums on Us: One free admission for Bank of America and Merrill Lynch card holders the first full weekend of every month. Bring your card and picture ID.
  • Free parking

 

Contact

612-726-1171

Connect with Historic Fort Snelling

Historic Fort Snelling on Twitter Historic Fort Snelling on Facebook Minnesota History Center on Flickr

2017 Dec 13

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Shops

Shops

The tools and materials that built and maintained the fort were made and repaired in the post shops. Watch a blacksmith demonstration.

History

Construction and repair facilities were essential to the maintenance of a military post in the wilderness. A list of the working shops compiled by Colonel Snelling in 1824 mentions a bakeshop, blacksmith, carpenter, armorer, wheelwright and harness shops. The stone building served as shops only until 1839. A second floor and porch were added, and the structure transformed into the new hospital. After the Civil War, in 1878, the military converted the building into laundress quarters and added a frame addition facing the old hospital, nearly doubling its size. The building was demolished in 1891.

Archaeology

Because 1839 construction added a wooden floor to cover a dirt blacksmith shop floor, that room has provided a wealth of archaeological information about the operation of the shop in its early years. The brick forge, anvils, work benches and vice are now back in their original locations. The type of metal scraps found in certain areas even indicated which anvil was used to make nails.

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